Mitral Valve Repair Reference Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital Mount Sinai

Our team has written and contributed to the textbooks which define the field of mitral valve repair and heart valve surgery.

 

Carpentier's Reconstructive Valve Surgery

Carpentier's Reconstructive Valve Surgery

Alain Carpentier, MD, PhD, David H. Adams, MD and Farzan Filsoufi, MD

 

Description:

Carpentier’s Reconstructive Valve Surgery presents you with authoritative guidance on reconstructive techniques for degenerative mitral valve disease. Alain Carpentier, MD, PhD-who pioneered the field-David H. Adams, MD; and Farzan Filsoufi, MD provide step-by-step instructions for each procedure and over 400 detailed anatomic drawings so that you can effectively apply the techniques of a master.

 

Key Features:
  • Apply the techniques and procedures of Dr. Alain Carpentier-pioneer of mitral valve reconstruction-to your practice.
  • View more than 400 detailed anatomic drawings that depict reconstruction procedures clearly.
  • Master each procedure using step-by-step instructions and a consistent chapter format.
  • Grasp the nuances of procedures thanks to “tips from the Master” and a section of questions and answers.
  • Tap into the knowledge and experience of leaders in the field of mitral valve repair and reconstruction.

 

Author Information:

Alain Carpentier, MD, PhD, Professor & Chairman Emeritus, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, European Hospital of Georges Pompidou, Paris, France

David H. Adams, MD, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Professor & Chairman, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY

Farzan Filsoufi, MD, Associate Professor & Associate Chief, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY

 

Buy this book:

Direct from Elsevier

Amazon.com

 

 

Hurst's The Heart, 13th Edition

Hurst's The Heart, 13th Edition

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Richard A Walsh, MD and Robert G. Harrington, MD

 

Description:

The trusted landmark cardiology resource—thoroughly updated to reflect the latest clinical perspectives. Through thirteen editions, Hurst’s the Heart has always represented the cornerstone of current scholarship in the discipline. Cardiologists, cardiology fellows, and internists from across the globe have relied on its unmatched authority, breadth of coverage, and clinical relevance to help optimize patient outcomes. The section on valvular heart disease has four of the six chapter completely rewritten by authors who are authorities in the field.

 

Chapter 77: Mitral Valve Regurgitation

David H. Adams, Blasé A. Carabello, and Javier Castillo
Pages 1721-1737

 

Excerpt:
“The normal mitral valve permits one-way blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle (LV) in an efficient, nearly frictionless fashion. Although even a normal competent valve may allow a trivial amount of reversed flow, more than a trace of mitral regurgitation is considered pathologic. Mild to moderate mitral regurgitation is tolerated indefinitely as long as it does not worsen. However, severe mitral regurgitation causes LV remodeling, reduced forward cardiac output, neurohumoral activation, LV damage, heart failure, and ultimately death. The natural history of mitral regurgitation depends intimately on its etiology, the severity of LV volume overload and its contractile performance, and the appearance of overlapping clinical conditions secondary to reversal of flow such as atrial fibrillation and pulmonary hypertension. In this setting, myxomatous degeneration of the mitral valve, a common pathologic substrate of mitral valve billowing (normal valve coaptation) and prolapse (deficient valve coaptation), is the most prevalent cause of isolated severe mitral regurgitation requiring surgical intervention in the United States. The following is a review of the normal mitral valve anatomy, as well as a summary of causes, consequences, and treatment of degenerative mitral vale regurgitation.”

 

 

Elsevier: Sabiston & Spencer’s Surgery of the Chest, 8th Edition: Sellke, del Nido & Swanson

Sabiston & Spencer Surgery of the Chest, 8th Edition

Frank Sellke, MD, Pedro J. del Nido, MD and Scott Swanson, MD

 

Chapter 78: Acquired Disease of the Mitral Valve

Farzan Filsoufi, Joanna Chikwe and David H. Adams
Pages 1207-1240

 

Excerpt:
“Mitral valve repair is the procedure of choice for correcting severe mitral regurgitation. The goals of valve repair include preservation of leaflet mobility, restoration of a large surface of coaptation, and stabilization of the results with a remodeling annuloplasty. Current surgical techniques allow surgeons to perform reconstructive surgery in almost all patients with mitral regurgitation, provided there is an adequate amount of pliable and mobile leaflet tissue. A systematic approach to reconstructive surgery include the determination of the exact mechanism of mitral regurgitation by intraoperative inspection and valve analysis; meticulous application of standard techniques of repair, including remodeling annuloplasty, and evaluation of the quality of repair by saline test and transesophagael echocardiography.”

 

Chapter 91: Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation

Anelechi C. Anyanwu, Lishan Aklog, David H. Adams
Pages 1429-1448

 

Excerpt:
“Ischemic mitral regurgitation is a leading cause of heart failure and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. This chapter addresses the current concepts regarding the pathophysiology and treatment of this condition.

Carpentier's pathophysiologic triad is our preferred approach for defining ischemic mitral regurgitation. Most of the clinical literature on ischemic mitral regurgitation remains difficult to interpret because imprecise definitions are often applied, which leads to marked heterogeneity within and between patient populations. We feel strongly that a precise definition of ischemic mitral regurgitation according to the pathophysiologic triad is critical to the presentation of a relatively homogeneous group of patients for analysis and treatment.”

 

 

Valvular Heart Disease: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease, 3rd Edition

Valvular Heart Disease: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease, 3rd Edition

Catherine M. Otto, MD and Robert O. Bonow, MD

 

Chapter 12: Surgical Approach to Aortic Valve Disease

Paul Stelzer and David H. Adams
Pages 187-208

 

Excerpt:
“In this chapter, we will review the spectrum of surgical options for patients with pathologic aortic valve and root conditions, with an emphasis on non-thrombogenic alternatives including valve repair, valve sparing, and biologic replacement options.”

 

 

Mastery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Edition

Mastery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Edition

Larry R. Kaiser, MD, Irving L. Kron, MD and Thomas L. Spray, MD

 

Chapter 41: Mitral Valve Repair: Ischemic

David H. Adams, Farzan Filsoufi, Lishan Aklog, and Sacha P. Salzberg
Pages 369-377

 

Excerpt:
“Mitral valve repair is the procedure of choice for correction for type IIIb ischemic mitral regurgitation. The main goal of valve repair is to restore a large surface of coaptation by aggressively reducing the septolateral dimension of the valve with a downsized remodeling (complete, rigid, or semirigid ring) annuloplasty.”

 

 

Elsevier: Sabiston & Spencer Surgery of the Chest, 7th Edition: Sellke, Swanson & del Nido

Sabiston & Spencer Surgery of the Chest, 7th Edition

Frank Sellke, MD, Scott Swanson, MD and Pedro J. del Nido, MD

 

Chapter 74: Acquired Disease of the Mitral Valve

Farzan Filsoufi, Sacha P. Salzberg, Lishan Aklog, David H. Adams
Pages 1299-1334

 

Excerpt:
“Mitral valve repair is the procedure of choice for correction of severe mitral regurgitation. The goals of valve repair include preserving leaflet mobility, restoring a large surface of coaptation, and stabilizing the results with a remodeling annuloplasty. Current surgical techniques allow surgeons to perform reconstructive surgery in almost all patients with mitral regurgitation, provided there is an adequate amount of pliable and mobile leaflet tissue. A systematic approach to reconstructive surgery include the determination of the exact mechanism of mitral regurgitation by intraoperative inspection and valve analysis; meticulous application of standard techniques of repair, including remodeling annuloplasty; and evaluation of the quality of repair by saline test and TEE.”

 

Chapter 86: Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation

Lishan Aklog, Farzan Filsoufi, David H. Adams
Pages 1525-1548

 

Excerpt:
“Patients with type I or IIIB ischemic MR typically present with one of two clinical scenarios. The more common scenario is a patient with symptomatic multivessel coronary artery disease, with or without associated congestive heart failure symptoms, who is referred for surgical or percutaneous revascularization and who is noted to have mild to moderate MR on preoperative echocardiography or ventriculography. The other scenario is a patient with moderate to severe MR and primarily congestive heart failure symptoms who is referred for mitral valve surgery and who is noted to have multivessel coronary artery disease on preoperative catheterization.

We have proposed a set of criteria to use to define ischemic MR. Some of the clinical literature about ischemic MR is difficult to interpret because of imprecise definitions that lead to etiological and physiological heterogeneity within the patient population. We feel strongly that a relatively simple-but precise-definition of ischemic MR is critical to the presentation of a relatively homogenous group of patients for analysis.”

 

 

Cardiac Surgery in the Adult

Cardiac Surgery in the Adult

Lawrence H. Cohn, MD and L. Henry Edmunds, Jr., MD

 

Chapter 39: Surgical Treatment of Mitral Valve Endocarditis

Farzan Filsoufi, David H. Adams
Pages 987-997

 

Excerpt:
“Infective endocarditis is a well-established cause of valvular heart disease and carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. During the last 50 years, the introduction and wide use of antimicrobial therapy have significantly changed the course of this disease. The majority of patients can be successfully treated medically with total eradication of the disease process. In certain clinical presentations, however, surgical intervention remains an indispensable adjunct to the management of acute and subacute endocarditis.”

 

Read Full Chapter

 

 

Braunwald's Heart Disease

Braunwald's Heart Disease, 7th Edition

Douglas P. Zipes, MD, MACC, Peter Libby, MD, Robert O. Bonow, MD and Eugene Braunwald, MD, MD (hon), ScD (hon), FRCP

 

Chapter 76: Medical Management of the Patient Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

David H. Adams, Farzan Filsoufi, Elliott M. Antman
Pages 1993-2020

 

Excerpt:
“Continued advances in cardiac surgery make operative repair of a variety of cardiac lesions a viable therapeutic alternative for numerous patients with cardiovascular disease. ... However, the profile of patients referred for surgery has also changed and includes more patients with advanced age, depressed left ventricular function, multiple comorbidities, prior revascularization operations or multiple percutaneous interventions, and failed acute interventional procedures, which has led to higher mortality rates in tertiary care referral centers that are called on to operate on such patients with greater frequency.

This chapter summarizes the information required by the cardiologist, whose important responsibilities include collaboration with the surgical team for both preoperative and postoperative care, especially care of the medical complications that may develop.”

 

 

Elsevier: Kaplan's Cardiac Anesthesia, 5th Edition: Kaplan, Reich, Lake & Konstadt

Kaplan's Cardiac Anesthesia, 5th Edition

Joel A. Kaplan, MD, David L. Reich, MD, Carol L. Lake, MD, MBA, MPH and Steven N. Konstadt, MD, MBA, FACC

 

Chapter 4: The Future of Cardiac Surgery and Anesthesia - The Future of Cardiac Surgery

Anelechi Anyanwu, David H. Adams
Pages 59-64

 

Excerpt:
“The future of cardiac surgery is closely related to the future of cardiology (see Chapter 3). Because of advances in diagnosis, better medical management, and changing epidemiology and prognosis of cardiovascular disease, the indications for surgical therapy have evolved considerably since the 1980s. However, the greatest determinant of future cardiac surgical practice is the rapidly expanding arena of interventional cardiology. Several diseases that were the domain of surgery can now be managed with percutaneous interventions. The scope and practice of cardiac surgery have evolved considerably since the 1950s (see Chapters 1 and 2) and will continue to evolve in response to these changes in epidemiology and cardiac diagnosis and management. New surgical procedures are being developed while some procedures have become obsolete. For example, in the 1980s, endoventricular resections formed the mainstay of treatment for intractable ventricular arrhythmias, but these procedures are rarely used and have been superseded by new pharmacologic agents and implantable defibrillators. In contrast, chronic atrial fibrillations (AF) encountered in surgical patients, which was regarded as untreatable in the 1980s, is now treated with surgical ablation (see Chapter 13). Changes in surgical practice have obvious implications for cardiac anesthesiology. The developments in cardiac surgery that are most likely to impact on the cardiac anesthesiologist are the changing demand, changing patients, evolution of new surgical techniques, and reduced invasiveness of surgery.”

 

Page Created: Wednesday, 17 May 2006

Last Updated: Friday, 14 January 2011

 

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